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A Letter to Michigan Governor Rick Snyder

Governor Rick Snyder:

I would ask you to block any legislation from the Michigan Lame Duck Legislature which would overturn the will of the constituents as determined through the November 6th vote or endorsed by petition and thereby blocked from being placed on the ballot due to deliberate legislative action passing it in the Michigan House and Senate pre-November 6th. As you already know proposals passed through elections require a two-thirds legislative vote to overturn them or alter.

It bothers me to have to write to you and urge you to block something which will subvert the will of your constituents in favor of a political party and which should also be very apparent to our State Senators and Representatives. I should not have to pen this email to you as they should know by now which is the more important of the two choices . . . we the constituents who they “should represent” in the Michigan State House/Senate or a gaggle of special interests such as big business, PACs funded by the Koch Brothers etc., or the 1% of the Household Taxpayers making greater than $500,000 annually in income. It was far greater than 51% of those who voted favorably in this last election for the proposals. It was those who also signed petitions to place other proposals on the ballot which were deliberately blocked and passed by legislative action in the State Legislature so they could later be overturned or changed in Lame Duck session. Do not allow the Legislature to:

– Change the intent of the Michigan One Fair Wage initiative by delaying and diminishing an increase in the minimum wage, something which came about as a result of a constituent Initiative.

– Change the intent of the Michigan Time To Care initiative by delaying and decreasing the amount of a worker’s earned sick leave, something which came about as a result of a constituent Initiative.

– Weaken the authority of the Michigan State Attorney General to bring suit or interfere with the Michigan Courts.

– Weaken the authority of the Secretary of State in monitoring elections and associated practices within Michigan.

– Block the new, popularly elected, State of Michigan Governor by diminishing the authority of the position making it less than what it is today under yourself.

I am adding my voice to the tens of thousands in Michigan calling upon you to act responsibility in representing us the constituents of your state and veto any and all changes to the recent proposals passed through a vote and those deliberately passed through legislative action (to be overturned after the election) before the November 6th election and endorsed by petition.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Regards,

run75441

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Michigan Today

US Auto Sales Fell by 4 Percent in the Third Quarter

“Major automakers said Tuesday that U.S. sales fell 7 percent in September and 4 percent for the June-through-September quarter, compared with the same periods last year.

Weaker numbers for September and the third quarter wiped out a 1.8 percent gain during the first half of the year, and left auto sales on pace with 2017. Some analysts had cautioned that the first-half gains were driven by incentives and low-margin sales to fleet buyers like rental car companies.”

Auto makers are blaming this on the hurricanes. More likely, it is building to an inventory goal without adjustments to meet demands. Inventory costs money.

Michigan’s Gubernatorial Race: Whitmer Focuses on ‘Fundamentals’ Like Roads

“Democrat Gretchen Whitmer said she is focused on fixing Michigan’s ‘fundamentals’ like roads, water systems and schools in her run for governor, contending that not spending enough on core services under Republican leadership has still left residents paying more out of pocket for car repairs and other unexpected expenses.

She said her polling lead over GOP rival Bill Schuette since last month’s primary shows the problem-solving message is resonating, but “not for one second” will she let up less than two months until Election Day. She dismissed as ‘phony political talking points’ Schuette’s warning that she would be the next Jennifer Granholm, a Democrat who was governor during the state’s protracted economic decline.

‘It’s not working. Maybe they’re going to figure that out at some point during this campaign, that people want solutions to problems,’ Whitmer told The Associated Press in an interview.”

Michigan Repubs and the AFP are claiming Whitmer is trying to steal another decade from Michiganders by fixing infrastructure through increased revenues.

US House Candidate Arrested During Wage Protest in Detroit

“A U.S. House candidate was arrested Tuesday in Detroit during a protest for higher pay and the right to form unions.

Democrat Rashida Tlaib and more than a dozen other demonstrators sat at — and banged on — a long table that took up a lane of traffic in Detroit’s Midtown. They were part of a group of several hundred people who marched along the street before gathering outside a McDonalds. Management inside locked the doors as marchers approached.

The protest followed one Tuesday morning in Flint where eight people were injured after being struck by a pickup truck as they marched outside another fast-food restaurant. Flint Police Chief Tim Johnson said he doesn’t believe the crash was intentional and that the driver “seemed pretty shaken up” afterward.

Both protests were organized by Fight for $15, a national movement seeking to increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour for fast food.”

I do not believe we would see Kavanaugh out there protesting for a $15/hour wage. He would be to busy trying to explain away what he meant by “boofed” as a teen.

Major GOP Group Pulls Support for 2 Imperiled Congressmen

“In an ominous sign for the GOP’s bid to hold onto the House, the political group affiliated with Speaker Paul Ryan on Friday dropped its support of two incumbent congressmen, signaling how difficult November could be for the Republican majority.

The Congressional Leadership Fund canceled $3.1 million in ad spending in the districts of Michigan Rep. Mike Bishop and Colorado Rep. Mike Coffman. It’s CLF’s first act of triage ahead of the election and comes at the time of the cycle when major spenders cut their losses in races they think are no longer winnable.
The Congressional Leadership Fund canceled $3.1 million in ad spending in the districts of Michigan Rep. Mike Bishop and Colorado Rep. Mike Coffman. It’s CLF’s first act of triage ahead of the election and comes at the time of the cycle when major spenders cut their losses in races they think are no longer winnable.

Dropping Bishop is perhaps the more significant sign of the party’s prospects. President Donald Trump won the suburban Detroit district by 7 percentage points while narrowly winning Michigan overall. But Republicans in Michigan have struggled this year, and Bishop has been regularly outraised by his challenger Elissa Slotkin, a former CIA agent and defense official.

Jesse Hunt, a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee, said the House GOP campaign arm has not canceled its ad reservations in either Bishop’s or Coffman’s district.”

It is too early to declare a victory. Pour it on . . .

State of Michigan Rank amongst the 50 states?

Click on the picture to make it bigger.

Republicans have a lot to account for in Michigan. They have controlled the legislature and the governorship since 2011. Republicans have controlled the Senate since 1992. Republicans have controlled the House 18 years since 1992. Since 1992, the governorship has been controlled by a Democrat 8 years of 26 years. Yet, everything is former Governor Granholm and Senate leader Whitmer’s fault for infrastructure being in bad shape.

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Michigan

I just posted a comment in the Comments thread to Bill H’s post on Michigan from Tuesday, and on a whim, because these issues hit a nerve for me, I’m reposting my comment as a full post here:

I love this post.  It hits upon a few of my obsessions, but especially these two: The lack of metropolitan-area public transportation (the complete absence of it or the utter inadequacy of it) in so many large metro areas in this country, and the local (rather than state or federal) funding of public education.

The public-transportation issue is just so in-your-face stunning in southeastern Michigan.  Detroit, for idiotic it’s-the-Motor-City reasons, is the only large Rustbelt city that has no rapid-transit system.  The most obvious—and I mean, it’s really, really obvious—way to revive Detroit and turn southeastern Michigan back into a thriving region is a system of fast, reliable, reasonably comfortable regional public transportation.  A sort-of diamond-shaped system running from Detroit to Ann Arbor to Lansing to Flint, through Pontiac, and back to Detroit would work miracles in a lot of people’s lives.  Add on a tail that runs from Detroit south through an area known as Downriver (which is mostly so-called working-class white) to Toledo, and ….

Michigan’s a surprisingly pretty state—lakes, rivers, tributaries galore—and it’s very green (literally).  It has large expanses of beautiful beaches.  It has two major public research universities and good regional state university system that includes a large one in Detroit.  It should not be a state in decline.

As for one of Bill’s larger points—this country’s obsession with complete local control over really important, basic government functions, and states’ rights to violate individuals’ rights at will—this plays a huge role in this country’s loss of economic competitiveness and its loss international esteem.  In no other democracy or advanced economy in the world do parents have to obsess about what school district this or that prospective home is in.  Does anyone think that, say, Canadians or Germans or Australians or the French worry about school districts?  Has anyone in this country stopped to think of why they don’t?

Nice post, Bill.

One thing Bill mentioned that I didn’t discuss in my comment is that Michigan (like several other states) tends to vote Democratic for president but Republican for government and state legislators.  That’s very largely a function of the fact that in modern times most states elect their statewide officeholders—governor, attorney general, etc.—in non-presidential-election years, and the drop-off in the number of Democrats who vote in those elections is dramatic.

So ALEC controls most state governments.

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