Relevant and even prescient commentary on news, politics and the economy.

PSA: FRB St. Louis Webcast Tonight, and Some from History

The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, without whose FRED database and Excel Add-in Economics Bloggers (and Matt Yglesias) would be Even More Boring, has been running a series of Discussions explaining why the Fed is incompetent—er, Why They Don’t Follow Their Dual Mandate—er, well, something about how They’re Doing The Best They Can.*

The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis will offer a live webcast of the finale of its fall evening discussion series for the general public, “Dialogue with the Fed: Beyond Today’s Financial Headlines,” on Monday, Nov. 21, 2011.

The dialogue will be streamed live from the St. Louis Fed’s Gateway Conference Center beginning at 7 p.m. CT/8 p.m. ET. It can be viewed at www.stlouisfed.org/live. No registration is necessary.

Christopher Waller, the St. Louis Fed’s senior vice president and director of research, will discuss “Understanding the Unemployment Picture.” After his presentation, Waller, along with St. Louis Fed economists David Andolfatto and Natalia Kolesnikova, will take questions from the on-site audience at the Bank.

If you cannot catch the live webcast, it will be archived and available on the St. Louis Fed web site within a few days of the event, along with videos of the first two dialogues.

View Lessons Learned from the Financial Crisis with Julie Stackhouse, senior vice president, Banking Supervision & Regulation
Held Sept. 12, 2011

View Bringing the Federal Deficit Under Control with William Emmons, assistant vice president and economist
Held Oct. 18, 2011

Attend, enjoy, ask them about the Beige Book. David Andolfatto tries to be One of the Good Guys (well, for a Simon Fraser guy**, at least). Give him some love, attention, and Questions He Will Love to Answer.

*Whether you find this idea even more disappointing than the others is left as an exercise, unless you’re looking for work, in which case:

**Think A Canadian Koch Brothers, but where the work is done in the Selection Bias.

Tags: , , Comments (0) | |