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The Kosher Butcher Who Was Not a Person Until He Incorporated Himself*

Religious liberty, [Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals] Judge Tymkovich wrote, cannot turn on whether money changes hands. “Would an incorporated kosher butcher really have no claim to challenge a regulation mandating non-kosher butchering practices?” he asked.

Court Confronts Religious Rights of Corporations, Adam Liptak, New York Times, today

Why, yes, Judge Tymkovich, of course an incorporated kosher butcher really would have a claim to challenge a regulation mandating non-kosher butchering practices.  But that’s because the kosher butcher also is an actual human and was one even before he incorporated himself, er, his butcher shop.

The butcher would have a claim as, um, the butcher–Ira Greenberg, human being, exercising his religious right to use kosher-butchering practices to kill his own food, and his religious right to obtain kosher meat in order to limit his meat eating to kosher.  He also would have a due process right to practice his trade and make a living, unencumbered by an utterly arbitrary and irrational prohibition (or, to use legal formality, a prohibition that has no legitimate governmental interest). And Ira Greenberg Kosher Meats, Inc., would have a similar due process claim, a constitutional claim that, unlike campaign-contribution claims or free-exercise-of-religion claims, could be invoked legitimately by a corporation, because it, unlike political contributions and religious practice, actually would concern the right to operate as the sort of business that it is.

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