Relevant and even prescient commentary on news, politics and the economy.

The Drug War Saved the System?

Charlie Stross talks about liquidity:

What we’ve just seen, hidden in the euphemism here, is a confession that drug cartels and other organized criminals have gone on a $352Bn asset-buying spree — and the banks and regulators, world-wide, turned a blind eye to this because the alternative was to allow the banks to collapse. And the corollary is that these investments are now in the system, laundered, whitewashed, and legit. These narcodollars aren’t neatly bundled up inside the mattress any more; they’re in the system, doing their owners’ bidding.

A third of a trillion dollars is a lot of money; it’s enough to fund the US military invading another country halfway around the world, or a manned Mars exploration program. Obviously, there’s no single Mr Big here, no Blofeld investing SPECTREs ill-gotten billions in an ambitious bid to go legit.

But one wonders whether the “organised criminals” have been investing in anything innovative. (Politicians, if they’re smart.) And what the long-term consequences are going to be …

It won’t be Stross’s next novel, but it might be Ben Bernanke’s. Or Larry Summers, whose latest foray into fiction is here.

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Inflation Detour II: Crisis and Recovery across Great "Fluctuations"

We are now almost 24 months into the Great Recession. While many expect NBER will eventually say that The Great Recession ended several months ago, they have not yet.

By contrast, the recession that began The Great Depression, per NBER, lasted 43 months. It seems only fair to compare the two, so I trust I can be forgiven for not yet having declared The Great Recession over.

One of the problems is that of official government data. Many of the statistics we now consider “standard” were first tracked as part of the government funding and jobs created by FDR’s Administration. (The irony of multiple economists and idiots arguing that the data shows that those programs should never have happened should not be lost on the reader.)

For an examination of Wall Street, though, reasonable proxy data is available. With some issues noted, we can use the change in Real Prices as a proxy. Comparing the two periods produces:

Fairly comparable. The market had a better six months prior to the October 1929 crash, which is rather neutralized by the drop about five months after the first Depression Recession begins, which is steeper than the comparable drop in the current period.

In spite of all the support for the banking system, the recovery is fairly comparable to the one from the Great Depression—at least so far.

Below the fold, let’s look at Main Street.

As noted above, most of the data required for measuring Main Street—most especially a reliable measure of unemployment—is not available publicly. (If anyone wants to provide me with a copy of the Haver Analytics data, for instance, I won’t complain. Meanwhile, see this post at CR for a graphic of that data from the Depression Era.)

So let’s take another approach. Accept, for the sake of discussion, the traditional Republican argument that inflation reduces the ability of Main Street to grow business, borrow money, and generally live.

If we therefore take the inverse of the Annual Inflation Rate, we can see the “gain” the consumer makes. (Note that, in most periods, the consumer is deemed to have lost. Reality may be different, as smoothing hides may variances. But that is always true, and likely always shall be.)

So let’s look at how Main Street fares, then and now:

Judging strictly by the two periods, it appears that Main Street did significantly better—speaking in terms of earning power—during the time leading up to and beginning the Great Depression than it has during the Great Recession. Indeed, the two paths track each other rather well.

It would appear—information that will surprise few other than perhaps Larry Summers and Tim Geithner—that all of the efforts of the Federal Reserve Board and the U.S. Treasury have had no positive effect on Main Street, leaving its purchasing power significantly lower than the same period of the Great Depression.

Probably more on this on a future rock. Comments and suggestions are rather welcome.

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