How Many of Obamacare’s New Enrollees Were Uninsured Last Year? Why It Doesn’t Matter

Maggie Mahar on the Uninsured:

As I explain in an earlier post, Charles Gaba, the enrollment guru who has been tracking Obamacare sign-ups since October, now estimates that by April 15, some 17 million Americans will have purchased their own insurance policies either in the Obamacare Exchanges (8 million) or off-Exchange (9 million)

But how many of them were uninsured and how many were simply replacing policies that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) had forced insurers to cancel?  This is the question conservatives ask.  After all they argue, if most of these folks already had coverage, we have just wasted a great deal of time and money moving them from a policy they chose to one that President Obama prefers.

There are two answers to their question. The first is that while we don’t have an exact number as to how many of the new enrollees were uninsured,we do know (thanks to Obamcare),  the percent of Americans who are “going naked” has declined.

Gaba offers a second, even better, answer: “It doesn’t really matter.”

I agree. As he explains:

“It doesn’t matter because every one of those new policieswhether on-exchange or off-exchange; whether it went to someone who didn’t have insurance before, someone who had their old policy cancelled or went to someone who voluntarily made the switch to a new one…which  . . is a LOT of people, by the way…is still a fully ACA-compliant, full-coverage healthcare plan.”

Gaba points out; “’the primary point’ of his website (ACASignups.net) ‘is to track how many people are now enrolled in a ‘QHP certified” plan regardless of whether they had insurance before or not. Some moved from no plan at all to a QHP. Others moved from a ‘junk’ policy to a QHP (some have argued that there aren’t that many of these, but there were still a lot of them). Still others yet (myself included) have moved from a decent plan to a QHP. . . . The point is, they’re all ACA QHPs now.” [his emphasis]

This is critical to understanding the purpose of health care reform. From the beginning the goal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was not simply to insure the uninsured, but to protect the under-insured by making certain that everyone has comprehensive coverage.  Whether a carrier is peddling policies in a state marketplace or off-exchange all plans now must comply with the ACA’s rules by:

 

  • covering the ten essential benefits

 

  • offering free preventive care, and

 

  • capping how much a patient can be asked to pay out-of-pocket.

 

Additionally, carriers can no longer discriminate against customers suffering from pre-existing conditions by charging them exorbitant premiums and they cannot set a limit on how much the insurer will pay out over the course of a year or a lifetime.

The second goal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is to make sure that the price of such high quality insurance is not beyond reach. Government subsidies help low-income and median-income families, but the only way to make sure that everyone else can afford policies meeting the ACA’s high standards is by asking all of us to share in the cost.

This is why the ACA mandates that everyone purchase insurance. When more people pay into the risk pool, the costs decline for everyone. It is only then that universal coverage becomes possible

Originally Appeared on HealthBeat: www.healthbeatblog/com