Relevant and even prescient commentary on news, politics and the economy.

For anyone who ever thought they were too busy to vote

For anyone who ever thought they were too busy to vote, meet 21-year-old Galicia Malone.

The south suburban Dolton mom-to-be was spotted at her polling place Tuesday morning on her way to give birth at a local hospital.

Cook County Clerk David Orr said Malone’s contractions were five minutes apart when she showed up around 8:30 a.m. at her precinct’s location named, yes, New Life Celebration Church.

Robert Waldmann spotted this (by proxy…Dan here)

Tags: , Comments (1) | |

Santorum Surge, Part 144

Let’s ignore that three of his four wins (including two last night) have come in non-binding caucuses and take a quick look at The Size of the Santorum Surge.

Over at Skippy, Our Leader posted a link to a discussion of whether “Romney’s strengths” could beat Obama. I wisecracked, without looking at the data, that the total Republican votes in all three states were lower than the daily NYC subway ridership.

My bad. That’s not even a ballpark comparison. On its lowest day, the NYC subway averages more than 2,350,000 riders. (That’s a lot of elitists, Newt.) It averages more than three million (3,000,000) on Saturdays, more than four million (4,000,000) riders a day, and more than five million (5,000,000) every weekday.

By comparison, here are the number of votes cast yesterday in Republican primaries/caucuses:

Clearly, we need a smaller comparative to make the turnout appear more impressive. So let’s look at one of my favorite demographic measures, Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs).

Keeping in mind that the MSA includes the areas around the cities named, the total voters in the three Republican elections yesterday would occupy…the 144th largest MSA,* just behind Eugene-Springfield, Oregon (351,715).

The Santorum Surge: Smaller than Peoria (#135), bigger than Kalamazoo (#148).

*I resist saying “Gross!” at this point.

Tags: , , Comments (5) | |

Election Story Interlude

In contrast to Mankiw’s attitude (see cactus’s post below*), my favorite election story of the year comes from Ms. Mochi_tsuki:

So they started explaining to me what an absentee ballot is and how to fill one out. I pointed out that I’d spent 11 years of my adult life overseas and was very familiar with the process. One of them pointed to the other and said, “He’s been overseas as well. He’s a retired Admiral.” WTF?

You may know this, but by law, there are never more than about 200 Admirals in service. Really rare creatures, those. This one? Retired last month. And he’s spending his weekends working on the GOTV effort in rural Virginia.

But I guess retired Admirals don’t need the motivations that economics professors do.

*In fairness to Mankiw, he knows his numbers are b.s. The giveaway: “In a sense, putting the various pieces of the tax system together, I would be facing a marginal tax rate of 93 percent. [italics mine]” Not to mention the corporate tax free finesse, and the assumption that r=0.10, but lets sidebar those.

Tags: , , , , , Comments (0) | |

Super Tuesday Voter Turnout

Hearing that democratic turnout has been stronger in the past primaries prior to Super Tuesday, I used C & L’s chart data to total up the voter count. I exclude the states that did not have duel party primaries. The turnout was 14,865,735 democratic to 8,929,123 republican. The republican turnout was 60% of the democratic turnout.

I then went to this map to see the “red states” from 2004 and calculated the voter turnout. Super Tuesday had 11 red states voting. Of those, 8 had more democratic voters than republican voters for Super Tuesday. For those 8 states (AR, CO, GA, MO, ND, OK, TN, UT) it was 3,407,658 democratic voters, 2,963,340 republican voters. The republican turnout was 87% of the democratic.

For the 3 remaining states of the 11 “red” (AK, AL, AZ) it was 1,001,540 republican voter turnout to 902,755 democratic voter turnout. The democratic turnout was 90% of the republican.

Interesting no? Cha, cha, cha changes…

Tags: , , Comments (0) | |