Relevant and even prescient commentary on news, politics and the economy.

Oh, God. Why does Clinton refuse to run on the Democratic Party platform? And against pro-Citizens United justices?

The Clinton campaign today made a key concession about its analysis of the fundamentals of the race. This concession was made almost in passing, as an afterthought, in a statement released late last night by Clinton communications director Jennifer Palmieri:

“One upside to Hillary Clinton’s break from the trail was having time to sharpen the final argument she will present to voters in these closing weeks.  So when she rejoins the trail tomorrow, Hillary Clinton will deliver the second in a series of speeches laying out her aspirational vision for the country: that we are “Stronger Together.” Tomorrow’s remarks will focus on what has been at the core of who Hillary Clinton is as a person and the mission of her campaign — how we lift up our children and families and make sure that every child has the chance to live up to their God given potential.

“Our campaign readily admits that running against a candidate as controversial as Donald Trump means it is harder to be heard on what you aspire for the country’s future and it is incumbent on us to work harder to make sure voters hear that vision.”  [Boldface in original.]

Hillary Clinton’s campaign just admitted she has a real problem, Greg Sargent, yesterday morning

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Comments (11) | |

Obamacare plans bring hefty fees for certain drugs? Really? Well … it depends on what the meaning of “bring” is.

MIAMI (AP) — Breast cancer survivor Ginny Mason was thrilled to get health coverage under the Affordable Care Act despite her pre-existing condition. But when she realized her arthritis medication fell under a particularly costly tier of her plan, she was forced to switch to another brand.

Under the plan, her Celebrex would have cost $648 a month until she met her $1,500 prescription deductible, followed by an $85 monthly co-pay.

Thus begins a deeply (but apparently unintentionally) confusing, yet very important, Associated Press article titled “Obamacare plans bring hefty fees for certain drugs,” published yesterday.  (The title may be Yahoo News’s, rather than the AP’s; it’s not clear.)

“‘I was grateful for the Affordable Care Act because it didn’t turn me down but … it’s like where’s the affordable on this one,’ said Mason, a 61-year-old from West Lafayette, Indiana who currently pays an $800 monthly premium,” Kelli Kennedy, the AP writer, continues.

Where, indeed, is the affordable on this one?  The essence of the article is that many people who have chronic serious illnesses, including, as Kennedy says, cancer, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis–and who, because of a preexisting condition,had had no access to any healthcare insurance or who, like Mason (as Mason explained to Kennedy), had insurance that did not cover treatment for preexisting conditions, are being hit by a specific of their ACA-compliant plan that they did not know about when they bought the plan: an apparently relatively new gimmick insurance companies are using, by which the company categorizes some high-cost drugs as “specialty-tier” drugs and by quietly including in their individual-market plans a 50%- “co-insurance” rate for “specialty-tier” drugs.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , Comments (7) | |

More On the Real Reason Healthcare Insurance Companies Are Now Encouraging Obamacare Enrollment

In light of some of the comments to my post yesterday arguing that that the real reason that healthcare insurance companies are now madly encouraging Obamacare enrollment is fear of a pro-public-option or pro-single-payer political juggernaut, I want to make clear that by single-payer I do not mean Medicare-for-all.   Single-payer would be, in essence, “the public option” extended to everyone rather than limited to the 5% of Americans who have private healthcare insurance through the non-group (i.e., non-employer-provided) market.  It is not tax-funded identical-for-all healthcare insurance, which is what Medicare is.  I do think that eventually this country will have Medicare-for-all-type healthcare insurance, but not in the near term.  If single-payer works well, then of course that would be the longterm solution, with no need for Medicare-for-all.

I also want to make a point about federalism as it relates to the ACA insurance-market exchanges and, especially, to Medicaid and, for that matter, to any other federal social-safety-network program.  I said in my post yesterday what I think is obvious: that federalism has been a disaster for Obamacare.  But I want to point out that the only reason that Medicaid works under current pre-Obamacare Medicaid is that that program came into being and was effectuated before the hard-right turn of the Republican Party.  Ditto for food stamps.  The really weird, but successful, argument by rightwing governors and state attorneys general to the Supreme Court in the ACA litigation on the Medicaid-expansion provision in the ACA is that, well, y’know, now that traditional Medicaid has been a part of each state’s law for decades, and is popular, it would be politically impossible for state legislators to end that program–the result under the ACA as the statute was written, if a state refused to agree to the ACA Medicaid expansion.  This, they argued–successfully!–meant that the ACA was effectively coercive of state  legislators and therefore infringed upon state sovereignty.  On that “ground,” the Supreme Court struck down that part of the Medicaid portion of the ACA.

That’s also known as the  conservatives-having-their-cake-and-eating-it-to theory of constitutional law.  The argument was so deeply hubristic that its actual success is stunning and outrageous.  But I have no idea why anyone would think that federalism must be a part of a national healthcare insurance law. It does not.

As for whether or not the public will catch on that the main problems with the Obamacare-exchanges-and-private-policies part of the Act is a failure of the healthcare insurance market and of the healthcare market itself–a question that several commenters raised–well, that was what my post was about.  Yes, the public will catch on, once the Dems have a smart, committed, knowledgeable and articulate spokesperson with a high enough national profile to educate them about it.  I expect that that will happen fairly soon.

Finally, although this should be the subject of a separate post, a hallmark of the current Supreme Court is how many really weird, outlandish rightwing arguments the current conservative-legal-movement five-member majority have made the law of the 50-state-soverign-lands.  As I said in an ignored post here last weekend, the Court’s neo-federalism-on-steroids jurisprudence has quietly but profoundly and thoroughly upended federal-in-relation-to-state constitutional law as it had existed since the post-Civil War era. This is a deeply dangerous juggernaut.

I wish more readers would read that post.  It does deal with really important stuff. Honestly.

Tags: , , , , , , Comments (17) | |