China’s Industrial Policy vs. US Random Behavior…Firedoglake

Rdan

Firedoglake presents a well written piece on US and Chinese trade policy:

China’s Industrial Policy vs. US Random Behavior

The U.S. China Economic and Security Review Commission has issued its annual report {giant .pdf}. Robert Borosage of the Campaign for America’s Future hosted a conference call for the Co-Chair of the Commission, Carolyn Bartholomew, and Clyde Presotwitz of the Economic Strategy Institute, who was U.S. Trade Representative under Reagan. The call offered these experts an opportunity to talk about China’s industrial policy.

Prestowitz said something that focused the entire issue for me. He pointed out that labor is not a significant factor in chip manufacture. Why then are so many chip manufacturing facilities located in China? He says it’s because the Chinese wanted these as part of their industrial policy, so they seized the land, built the infrastructure, provided low-cost loans, granted energy and water subsidies, trained a work force, and gave the manufacturers tax breaks. Now they offer more subtle incentives, funding for research and development, refunds of the value added tax and space in industrial parks. As Prestowitz said, the plants are there for financial reasons.

This is Chinese policy. They want to grow their economy by attracting foreign capital and foreign technology. They intend to maintain state control over crucial industries.

China’s overall industrial policy … is characterized by three main parts: (1) the creation of an export-led and foreign investment-led manufacturing sector; (2) an emphasis on fostering the growth of industries such as high-technology products that add maximum value to the Chinese economy; and (3) the creation of jobs sufficient to reliably employ the Chinese workforce, thereby allowing the Chinese Communist Party to maintain control.

Many Chinese subsidies violate the requirements of the World Trade Organization, and the US has sought sanctions, but the Commission says that the WTO rules are meant to deal with narrow issues, not the broad national practices of China. The WTO rules require consultations as well as litigation, and even after a victory, they are able to delay. By the time the US and Canada won a WTO ruling barring favoritism in manufacture of auto parts, many manufacturers had moved production to China, so those jobs were lost.

Don’t think that we will be able to compete with our high tech products. China uses industrial policy to achieve technology transfer. Here’s an example from the call. China had not mastered several crucial issues in the manufacture of jet propulsion blades.

Several thoughts come to mind:

1. Appeals to the notion that command economies fail is not re-assuring at best and grossly misleading at worst. Since 1992 Chinese leaders took a different turn from our old notions of ‘command’ economies of cold-war stories.

2. China is wrenching a pre-industrial economy into the 21st century, at a speed that is breathtaking. The US is struggling with shedding 20th century notions of what we think we are…

3. There is no reason to think that ‘green shoots’ industries are assured in the US as a jobs policy. Such industry building is already occurring in China (and Germany).

4. We insist China re-direct its drive to a domestic consumer orientation, and talk about how the government deliberately keeps the economy as an export platform, but if many times more money is made currently exporting due to high prices for exports than if sold domestically, would you change direction in a hurry? Who is getting the bargain overall? Many Chinese businesses are still learning new standards.

5. Chinese leaders are taking a big gamble. And Chinese society is taking a big hit overall, with great disruption in people’s lives. The US is also experiencing great change…slower perhaps, but we haven’t really accepted the fact nor figured out that we have change to no matter what.

6. Some of the unease on right and left is due to some sort of view of this change. Is it along the lines we are used to, and/or simply myopic?

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