Issues Affecting Economic Growth – Gored Oxen Edition

I write about issues I believe affect economic growth. For example, over the years, I have written a lot about taxes. And here’s a simple graph showing why:

Tax Rates v Growth in Real GDP per capita

What we see is that tax rates at any given time seem to be related to the growth rate of real GDP per capita over the next decade. What is more, the correlation is positive. That is to say, growth tends to be faster when tax rates are higher, and not lower. This of course contradicts popular belief, particularly among Republicans. However, since economic growth is important for the quality of life of all Americans, getting this right matters. Unfortunately, over the past few decades, government policy has gradually moved us in a direction that inhibits growth.

Of course, it could be the relationship between tax rates and future growth shown in the graph is a spurious correlation. But that is unlikely, since it is very easy to explain why (up to a certain point) higher tax rates would lead to faster economic growth. Additionally, even people who get the direction of the correlation wrong are certain a correlation is there. But… if it ever does turn out that the relationship is spurious, we won’t find that out by keeping our head in the sand.

Another topic I have been writing on a lot lately is immigration. Here’s what a graph looking at the foreign born population in certain years and the growth rate of real GDP per capita over the next ten years:

Foreign Born Population v. Growth in Real GDP per capita

The correlation between the share of the population that is foreign born and the growth rate is negative, which indicates that as the foreign born share rises, growth falls. The correlation between these two variables, at least in the post WW2 era, is stronger than the correlation between tax rates and growth. This of course contradicts popular belief, particularly among Democrats. However, since economic growth is important for the quality of life of all Americans, getting this right matters. Unfortunately, over the past few decades, government policy has gradually moved us in a direction that inhibits growth.

Of course, it could be the relationship between the percentage of the population that is foreign born and future growth shown in the graph is a spurious correlation. But that is unlikely, since it is very easy to explain why (up to a certain point) having less immigration would lead to faster economic growth. Additionally, even people who get the direction of the correlation wrong are certain a correlation is there. But… if it ever does turn out that the relationship is spurious, we won’t find that out by keeping our head in the sand.

If it seems to you that I have written almost exactly the same thing about taxation and immigration, it isn’t your imagination.  I did a copy and paste of a big chunk of the first half of the post to the second half and changed a few words.  The fact is, the analysis is very similar. The only difference is whose ox is getting gored. A grown up is willing to look the data in the eyes and follow it where it goes.

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