Two Stories on Cause and Effect

Cause and effect leaves little room for how people want the world to work.  Here are two stories illustrating that.

From Bloomberg:

A Swiss maker of hamburger buns for McDonald’s Corp. said it’s struggling to run a Chicago bakery after it lost a third of its workers in a clampdown on 800 immigrants without sufficient documentation.

About 35 percent of the workers at Cloverhill Bakery had to be replaced, according to Zurich-based Aryzta AG. The company, which makes baked goods for fast-food chains and supermarkets, said the employees were supplied by a job-placement agency that faced federal audits earlier this year.

The piece goes on:

The raid on workers at Cloverhill is one of the biggest U.S. employment headaches reported by a European company so far as President Donald Trump has made curbing undocumented immigration a centerpiece of his presidency. Aryzta said it faces challenges in retaining staff in the U.S. and pressure to raise wages.

Wait… removing workers who are here illegally increases demand for American workers and boosts wages? How can this possibly be? This must violate some law of economics.  Next someone will come up with the crazy idea that there are other effects, such as on housing costs, traffic and congestion, and government expenditures.

Here’s an unrelated story, out of Philadelphia:

A Philadelphia city councilwoman is defending her controversial bill that would force certain businesses to remove bulletproof barriers separating cashiers and customers.

Councilwoman Cindy Bass said in a statement her proposed legislation only affects stores applying for a “large establishment” license, or sit-down restaurants where food is served and there is seating and tables for 30 or more people.

The goal is to crack down on so-called “stop-and-go” shops, or convenience stores that sell hot food and alcohol, many of which have become nuisances to neighborhoods with intoxicated and unruly customers, according to Bass and other lawmakers.

Here’s more:

Her bill would also require large establishments to have a publicly accessible restroom and serve food regularly. Bass said in many instances, stop-and-go stores claim to sell hot food to obtain liquor licenses, selling liquor “by the shot” and operating “under fraudulent circumstances.”

Also:

Bass tried to clarify that her bill would only regulate large establishments, not corner stores, small pharmacies or similar businesses. She said her office has also proposed safety alternatives to barriers, such as lighting, cameras, security guards, security wands and police check-ins.

A Fox affiliate has a bit more information and more clarity:

The bill, put forward by Councilwoman Cindy Bass, focuses on “stop-and-go” convenience stores that act more like bars than the restaurants they are licensed to be, selling beer and shots of liquor over the counter and attracting crowds that end up becoming public nuisances, lawmakers say.

“If the glass comes down, the crime rate will rise and there will be lots of dead bodies,” Rich Kim, the owner of Broad Deli, which sells soda, meals and beer by the can, told FOX29. “The most important thing is safety and the public’s safety.”

Kim said the glass went up after a shooting and says it saved his mother-in-law from a knife attack.

Pennsylvania state law mandates businesses with restaurant licenses should regularly sell food and have tables and chairs to seat 30 people. But some, according to an investigation by local news station 6ABC, keep their seating locked up or out of reach and the grills shut down, selling little more than alcohol and forcing customers to wander outside.

Consumption of alcohol away from the confines of the store then leads to problems, State Rep. Jordan Harris, a Democrat who represents Philadelphia, told Fox News.

Someone should inform the good Councilwoman don’t get it that unnecessarily inconveniencing customers makes for a poor business model, particularly using expensive bulletproof barriers to do it. And yet, businesses in certain areas keep inconveniencing customers by using those barriers. Perhaps the Councilwoman and her fellow Councilmembers should ask themselves what is going on, or in a few years they’ll be asking why there are no businesses at all in those very same areas.

Tags: , , , , , , , Comments (32) | |