‘Employment Effects of International Trade’

Via Economist’s view:

Mark Thoma writes: ┬áThis is a research summary from the NBER Digest. It discusses work from Autor, Dorn, Hanson, and Song that finds “Workers bear substantial costs as a result of the ‘shock’ of rising import competition”:

Employment Effects of International Trade, by Claire Brunel, NBER Digest: In the past two decades, China’s manufacturing exports have grown dramatically, and U.S. imports from China have surged. While there are many reports of plant closures and employment declines in sectors where import competition from China and elsewhere has been strongest, there is little evidence on the long-run effect on workers. In Trade Adjustment: Worker Level Evidence (NBER Working Paper No.19226), David Autor, David Dorn, Gordon Hanson, and Jae Song examine the impact of exposure to rising trade competition from China on the employment and earnings trajectory of U.S. workers between 1992 and 2007. They find that workers bear substantial costs as a result of the “shock” of rising import competition. The adjustment to such shocks is highly uneven across workers, and varies according to their previous conditions of employment.

(bolding is mine)

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