Relevant and even prescient commentary on news, politics and the economy.

A little bit about our supreme court and corporate power

In case you did not see this, it is my Senator’s opening comments at the Gorsuch hearings.  He sums up just what a 5/4 split court has been doing.

 

This is his discussion on Cspan about his book: Captured: The Corporate Infiltration of American Democracy

 

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Did you hear the one about a corporation and a democracy?

Time for a bit of comic relief. (video below the fold)  Julianna reporting on Net Neutrality.  Remember when President Obama said the days of lobbyists setting the agenda was over?

I’m posting this here because this is about “markets”.  It is about competition.  It is about freedom.    The free market competition of…wait for it…IDEAS.  It is not corporations or products that compete they only represent the materialization of what truly is protected in this nation, of what is the singularity within the US Constitution: IDEAS.  Everything, outside of nature its self is derived from ideas.  I was taught this about economics in high school in the early 70′s.  Was I taught incorrectly?

 

Here’s the thing about ideas competing.  The business model is not the end all and be all for the means by which to determine their value, as some have worked so hard to have society and the world believe.  That an idea can not be immediately or expediently monetized is not determinate of its worth to life and the reduction of the risks of living.

It is not just about the money.

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Who is the true beneficiary of welfare? or Please define: Entitlement

I wrote in February of 2012 about welfare: Welfare, I’m not hurting from it and neither are you.

I noted the following: but it looks to me like what we spend on welfare is not much more than what the government is spending on just doing the government thingy, unless of course people can’t get a job. Interestingly enough, the share of GDP spent on welfare in 1992 and 2010 is the same. In fact, at the peak of unemployment of the 2001 recession which was 2003, we spent just 0.0098 on welfare.

Understand that 0.0098 is the fraction of our GDP spent on welfare.  That is 0.98% of our GDP.  I did not include the medicaid/healthcare expenditures.

Of course there was the often heard comment to this article about welfare recipients not contributing. No skin in the game, not contributing, blah, blah, blah….stuff for free.  My first response and really the only needed response is “So what?”  I mean really Sooooooooo What!  Is the welfare person really stopping you from getting your Mercedes?

Well here’s the so what. The Public cost of low-wages in the Fast -food Industry

“Nearly three-quarters (73 percent) of enrollments in America’s major public benefits programs are from working families. But many of them work in jobs that pay wages so low that their paychecks do not generate enough income to provide for life’s basic necessities.”

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The Great Recession captured in 1 minute of comedy

Just watch this.  It is 1 minute long.

Could it be anymore surreal?

HOW MANY TIMES DO WE HAVE TO DO THIS? HOW MANY FREAKIN’ TIMES DO WE HAVE TO LEARN THE LESSON?

Obviously, the lesson has not been relearned since at least sometime before 1992.  If it had been relearned, we would not be here still proposing solutions that sound just like, almost word for word like the 1920′s.  (start reading at 1920) I mean, it’s not like people haven’t been sounding the horn on what the results would be from the proposed solutions in 1992.   Nope, it’s the same proposals as in 1992, which will produce more of the same.

 

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Welfare, I’m not hurting from it and neither are you.

A good friend and I got into an email debate. He sent me the latest message regarding how wonderful it is that Florida is going to be drug testing welfare recipients. I responded that I’ll consider the policy when we start testing all the CEO’s who get welfare for their sector of the economy, the lawyers, judges and all country club members.
I also noted welfare is not the problem He noted it’s not “the” problem, but it is “a” problem and he knows this from talking to people. I know of welfare too. I have served on two nonprofit boards, one for substance abuse and the other The Providence Center. My family adopted a family when I was in junior high. We had foster children. I was a day counselor for 2 weeks in the summer of ’73 for 7 to 12 year olds from 3 of the most horrible housing developments in the city of Providence. We had the “Institute” literally right around the corner from where I lived.  My daughter is doing a year with NeighborWorks America
Welfare is not the problem. But, my friend is a very smart person and an engineer, so I needed some numbers. Using this site I checked out what the ratio of spending on Family and Children and Housing is to our GDP. I used GDP and not the overall budget because hey, we all worked to earn that money and it might as well be used for something that is heart warming.  The following numbers are total national spending (Fed, State, Local).

The year 1962 is the first year that there is spending listed for both Family and Children and Housing. Prior to that only Housing is listed as having spending. For 1962, the combined total ratio was 0.0027. That is 0.27% of our GDP was spend on families, children and housing. I started with 1970 and went forward using the endings of the presidential terms starting with 1980.
1970: 0.0035
1980: 0.0092
1988: 0.0093
1992: 0.0134
2000: 0.0092
2008: 0.0097
2010: 0.0141
First of all, these are miniscule percentages of our GDP. Second, it sure looks to me like the best way to solve the “welfare problem” is to solve the economic problem.
Of course, this means nothing if we don’t have other government spending patterns to compare too. I mean, how do we know if welfare is “out of control” if we can’t compare it to other spending? The same data set has two other categories: General Government and Other Spending. You can click on each to see the sub categories. But, just so you know General Government consists of Executive and Legislative organ, Financial and General services. Other does not include: Pensions, Education, Health, Defense, Protection, Transportation or interest. Other is just that: Other. Here is how the numbers look.
 
This is how the numbers flow as log function.

 

Call me stupid, but it looks to me like what we spend on welfare is not much more than what the government is spending on just doing the government thingy, unless of course people can’t get a job. Interestingly enough, the share of GDP spent on welfare in 1992 and 2010 is the same. In fact, at the peak of unemployment of the 2001 recession which was 2003, we spent just 0.0098 on welfare.
Here is another comparison. In 2009 we spent $167 billion on Family/Children and Housing. That year, we also spent $161 billion in the Other category of “Economic Affairs”. I don’t know what that is, but if it has anything to do with what we are experiencing I don’t think we got our money’s worth. This item went from -7.0 in 1997 to 7.8 in 2002 to 17.5 in 2005 to 1.3 in 2007 back to 17.7 in 2008. It landed at -79.7 in 2010. Hummmmmmmmm. I think Glen Beck would like this category. You know, who’s been playing with the money in the cookie jar? In fact, why did we not know that a cookie jar exists?
It doesn’t make me feel good to think that we spend about as much on the top office operations of this country as we spend on helping people. Think about it. What percentage of the “welfare problem” do
you believe is a problem? You know those drug addled lazy moochers who are preventing all us moral and hardworking folks from living the good life of our congress persons. Be careful now. This is a trick question. See, it won’t take much of a “problem” subtracted from what we spend to find ourselves spending less to take care of families and their children than we spend on the top office operations in this nation. That’s just plain being cheap. Down right, out and out cheap SOB’s even if we leave in all of the “problem”.

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Senators Levin and Isakson: millionaire surtax vs corporate repatriation subsidy

by Linda Beale

Senators Levin and Isakson: millionaire surtax vs corporate repatriation subsidy

The PBS News Hour last night interviewed Senators Levin and Isakson on the jobs bill (video and transcript available here).

Isakson was first off.  He sounded like a right wing sound bite machine: we’re overregulating businesses so we need a “time out” on regulation.  And we need to pass a repatriation tax holiday so businesses can get the money they need to invest and create jobs.

Levin was asked what he thought about that.  He didn’t even comment on the repatriation sound-bite–after all, he has a report just out that investigates the idea of repatriation and concludes it was a losing proposition.   See  Repatriating Offshore Funds: 2004 Tax Windfall for Select Multinationals, Permanent Committee on Investigations Majority Staff Report, Senate (Oct. 11, 2011) (listing a series of findings showing that repatriation failed to accomplish its goals).**

But Levin did respond to the “it’s regulations and taxes that are killing job creation” GOP mantra.  A recent poll of small business owners showed that small business owners aren’t worried about regulations or taxes.  They just need customers.   So you can help things out by helping small businesses and helping people become customers.

Makes sense, doesn’t it?  It’s certainly an argument made here on ataxingmatter many times: the way to create customers is to stop the collapse of the American middle class with programs like infrastructure projects.

Woodruff then asked Isakson what he had to say to that.  His response–yeah, well, the vote we have tonight is the pay-for–a surtax on millionaires.  And there are 392,000 small businesses that a surtax on millionaires is going to hurt.

So now Woodruff asks Levin what about this argument that the surtax is gonna hurt small businesses.

Levin set the facts straight on his colleague’s claim that a surtax on millionaires would hurt all those small businesses.  He said quite clearly that the facts show that only a very small percentage of small business owners earn the million that would put them in the group subject to the surtax.  So the issue is taxing millionaires, whose share of the income has skyrocketed in the last few years compared to the middle class, which has stagnated.  The surtax would mainly hit the overpaid CEOs of big corporations, etc.

Funny, Judy Woodruff (an undergraduate classmate of mine back at Duke, by the way) didn’t blink an eye.  You’d think the next question to Isakson would be–given the fact that only a tiny proportion of small businesses would be subject to the millionaire surtax, Senator, a fact that has been pointed out numerous times, why do you insist on claiming that it would hurt all small businesses.  But she didn’t.  The PBS station is worried about appearing “balanced” and that means you can’t call a fact a fact and point out that a presenter is stating something that isn’t supported in the facts.  You let an interviewee do it, if they can get it in, but you let the other side get by with continuing to repeat its fact-less sound bites.

So Senator Isakson’s response was:

[Senator Levin's] response to that question just proves this is all about political messaging and really doesn’t have anything to do with purpose, because if they really cared about small business, they would exempt limited liability corporations, S-corporations and sole proprietorships from the application of this tax. Then they’d only be taxing millionaires. But they’re going after small business as well.\

Now, folks, that’s a ridiculous response.  (Woodruff didn’t say that, but I will.)  It’s ridiculous because Levin gave the facts–small businesses don’t complain about regulations, most small businesses don’t make millions and wouldn’t be subject to the surtax.  And Isakson had the gall to call that factual response “political messaging” , even while Isakson continued with his GOP soundbite political message campaign of implying that small businesses need to be protected from the millionaires surtax!

Note also that Isakson suggested that tif there had to be a surtax, it should exempt LLCs, S corporations and sole proprietorships.  He offered no justification whatsoever for that terribly broad exemption (other than the proffered “it’ll hurt small businesses that Levin already soundly defeated).  If you’re making millions from your business, you are successful enough to pay the tax.  If you are not, you won’t have to pay the tax.  If you exempt LLCs (mostly operated as partnerships) and S corporations and sole proprietorships, you are exempting a lot more than small businesses!  Those include hedge and private equity funds (some managers of which make hundreds of millions a year), real estate partnerships, huge businesses operating as sole proprietorships, and  people like John Edwards who make millions through their S corporations etc. etc. etc.  If you couple that with the zero taxation on capital gains that most on the right are pushing for, that’d likely mean that the CEOs of multinational corporations would be the ONLY millionaires and gazillionaires that the tax would hit!

But did Judy follow up along those lines?  Nope.  Instead she asked Isakson whether the country doesn’t need stimulus rather than cutting at this fragile time for the economy.

His response was to deliver the right wing political message yet again:

1.  the right’s response to the fact that the last stimulus made a huge difference–a claim that it didn’t solve tthe problem permanently (with the implication that we might as well not have done it).  Says Isakson (paraphrasing):  Last bill paid teachers, but once the bill is gone, there’s no money to pay them.  (Implication–the stimulus was useless.  I doubt that the teachers whose jobs were saved for a few years would agree or the students who were saved from overcrowded classrooms or the lack of a music program.)

2.  the right’s response to the need to enact a stimulus rather than cutting–we’ve got a debt problem and a debt crisis.   Isakson says “we’re at the breaking point on leverage” so he wants to “inspire the private sector to reinvest in our country and reinvest in businesses.”   (of course, this overlooks the fact that the “debt crisis” was caused by right-wing obstructionism. or that the US Treasury can borrow now at the cheapest rate we can expect to see forever once this crisis ends–we should borrow cheap while we can, spend it on infrastructure and job creation.  It also roundly ignores the historic pattern that businesses won’t invest in US business when (a) we allow them to expatriate assets to create businesses abroad without taxing them on the built in gains in those assets, (b) we allow them to fire workers with ease because we’ve so weakened our labor laws that workers find it almost impossible to form unions and have any negotiating power with their bosses and (c) we continue to give businesses tax breaks for mergers and consolidations that create multinational super businesses that have no loyalty to the country  (Jeff Immelt said as much in the previous night’s NewsHour broadcast).

_______

**The report lists the findings as follows:

1. U.S. Jobs Lost Rather Than Gained; 2. Research and Development Expenditures Did Not Accelerate;  3. Stock Repurchases Increased After Repatriation; 4. Executive Compensation Increased After Repatriation; 5. Only A Narrow Sector of Multinationals Benefited; 6. Most Repatriated Funds Flowed from Tax Havens; 7. Offshore Funds Increased After 2004 Repatriation; 8. More than $2 Trillion in Cash Assets Now Held by U.S. Corporations ; 9. Repatriation is a Failed Tax Policy

originally published at ataxingmatter

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Corporate Taxes from the AEI perspective–the AEI report gets an F

by Linda Beale

Corporate Taxes from the AEI perspective–the AEI report gets an F
crossposted with Ataxingmatter

[edited to correct typos and add link to CTJ and Leonhardt articles 2/19pm]

Kevin Hassett, an economic grunt at the American Enterprise Institute and frequent contributor to the Wall Street Journal op-ed pages, prepared a report for the institute on corporate taxation. Guess what–it claims that the US overtaxes its corporations and that is the reason that we are losing jobs.

There are all sorts of things wrong with this report.

1) it disregards the impact of globalization on corporate decisions to move enterprises, and the fungibility of operations if jurisidictions left don’t make the exit a highly taxing moment. It also disregards the lack of protection for US workers–yes, US workers are better paid than workers in undeveloped countries, and if multinational enterprises (MNEs) can merely substitute the one for the other, they will.

2) It first spends a lot of ink on the US statutory rate, complaining that it is higher than that of most other OECD countries. That is true, but really meaningless in itself. You can’t have a decent understanding of a country’s tax policies without looking at both tax rates and the base against which they are assessed. Since the corporate tax base in the US has more holes than Swiss cheese, looking at the rate tells you almost nothing about the corporate burden.

3) It notes that corporate taxes raise much less in revenue as a percent of GDP in the US than in other OECD countries. Somehow, the report intends this to be an indictment of the US corporate tax system as overtaxing corporations. I suppose the authors reach that by implying that corporations have fled the system and that’s why. But it is really an indication that the thesis in the title of the report–that the US gets an F for bad taxes that are making US corporations uncompetitive–is wrong. The US has such a loophole riddled corporate tax system that corporations are easily able to avoid paying their fair share of taxes. IN fact, other countries have more effective tax systems that get more corporate taxes out of their corporations as a percent of GDP, so the US must be a tax haven. It is rather surprising that we haven’t had an upsurge of grass-roots, tea party-style protests against all the big MNEs that manage to benefit mightily from the use of tax revenues (from roads to water to workers’ comp to subsidized health care) yet pay next to nothing in taxes in return.

For some examples of these MNEs with low taxes and much use of benefits, see David Leonhardt, The Paradox of Corporate Taxes in America, New York Times, Feb. 2, 2011 . Leonhard points out that Carnival Corporation “wouldn’t have much of a business without help from various branches of government” from the Coast Guard to Customs to road building and bridges and port maintenance, but the biggest benefit mayh be the price it pays, since it has only paid total (federal, state, local and foreign) taxes over the last five years equal to 1.1% of its $11.3 billion in profits.” Other major US corporations with substantial economic profits pay corporate taxes less than 10%–Yahoo (7%), Boeing (4.5%), Prudential Financial (7.6%). Id. (And wasn’t Prudential one of the banks that got to use the Treasury’s ultra vires notice permitting banks that acquired other banks to use their losses without the strict limitation provided in the tax code section 382?)

4) It claims that the US corporations’ effective tax rate is still way higher than for other countries. To do this, it uses two formulaic calculations for effective tax rates, neither of which is particularly trustworthy as to actual effective tax rates. It finds that its two hypothetical measures of effective tax rates come out at 29% and 23.6%. These are probably too high, but are considerably less than the statutory rate. it doesn’t, for example, look at the amount of actual taxes paid compared to the amount of taxable income reported. That figure would suggest a higher effective rate than actually experienced, since taxable income is much less than economic income. It doesn’t do what makes even more sense, look at actual current taxes paid as noted on financial statements of reporting companies compared to economic income as noted on financial statements of reporting companies. That number would be fairly accurate, and in fact comes out very low indeed. See, e.g., CTJ study, Revenue-Positive Reform of the Corporate Income tax, Jan 25, 2011 (noting that a Bush study in 2007 found only a 13.4% effective tax rate for 2000-2005, compared to a 16.1% rate for other OECD countries).

5) In comparing US corporations’ statutory taxes to those in other OECD coutnries, it takes into accout state and local corporate taxation (average) rates. But note that the US has primarily corporate income taxes, while OECD countries may have a host of other taxes, including in most cases a substantial value-added tax system (VAT). The report doesn’t bring that tax into the comparison. As a result, its comparison is again meaningless, because it isn’t really comparing the overall tax burden to determine whether the US corporations are in fact paying tax haven rates or being stymied in competition.

6) And of course, these corporate excusers provide only the slimmest of rationales for asserting that the US is aided by improving the competitiveness of MNEs in other countries–usually along the lines that helping them invest more abroad will also have a spillover effect in terms of more investment here. Actually if we help them succeed there by reducing taxes here, we are cutting off our noses to spite our face, since they will move operations there and do less here. We’d be much better off using that money to fund education and basic scientific research that can improve our quallity of life and give us new things to manufacture!

As usual with the AEI, the ideological agenda has resulted in a report that primarily serves a propaganda purpose. I’d say that it isn’t US corporate taxes that get an F, but rather this AEI report!

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Price elasticity, taxes and wages: Or, why I don’t take wingnut economics seriously

by Bruce Webb

It is I think a truism that in any economic enterprise all costs ultimately have to come out of price, that in the end ‘the customer pays’. But what is not true is that price is infinitely elastic, at some point price in and of itself will restrain demand, and while you can prop up demand through some things like advertising and marketing (the ‘gotta have it factor’), at some point the ancient principle ‘what the market can bear’ will kick in. This principle is so obvious as to hardly be worth stating yet many on the Right simply turn it off and on as needed.

This was highlighted in what Kevin Drum aptly called a checkbo9ok tax:

The Democrats supporting the current legislation have assured an anxious electorate that whatever funds are used to create whatever regulatory scheme created will come from the banks, not the taxpayers. Let me emphasize that so that even casual readers will catch it: the Democrats promise that you won’t pay for their legislation, banks will.

Really?

Since when have corporations ever paid taxes, fees or penalties? Employees end up paying in the form of lower salaries and benefits. Customers end up paying in the form of higher costs.

And in this case, every account holder will be forced to pay higher fees on their checking account and savings account. That’s you, my friendly reader. Can you say “checkbook tax”? I can, and I think lots of candidates will be saying it come November.

Yes, just as the entire Republican membership of the Senate is repeating Luntz’s last gem: “Taxpayer funded bailout”. But it is crap economics.

In wingnuttia, prices are entirely elastic in regards to taxes, they just flow through to customers. Yet they are sticky in regards to anything else, for example increases in minimum wage just cost jobs. Nowhere in the argument is the real claim revealed, that taxes squeeze profits, and that managers and owners are simply looking out for their own interests.

The argument that corporate taxes somehow are just double taxation because ultimately all cost has to come out of price is just bullshit, it is the internal division of the proceeds from that sale that make all the difference, and ultimately the sales price is disconnected from simple cost. Yet the Frank Luntz’s of this world trot this same ‘elastic for thee but not for me’ argument time and time again. And it WORKS! They can always sell just about anything by pretending that the main concern of the commercial operation is jobs on the one hand and low prices on the other when the reality is that the suits could give a crap about either, if they can boost profits by closing a plant here and boosting a price there they will. Everyone knows this yet somehow the Frank Luntz’s of this world can still sell this message with a straight face.

I just don’t get it.

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Agribusiness, Food, Vegetarianism—-and Taxes

[cross-posted on ataxingmatter--see posting there for additional comments]

As some of you may know, I am one of the many people who eat a vegetarian diet. I don’t eat cows, pigs, fish, whales, sharks, chicken, turkey, sheep, wild game, tame game… As I sometimes say when people ask me about my diet, I eat everything you eat, except for a very short list of items–the critters that can move themselves from one place to another (or move their appendages) under their own propulsion.

(Note that we often have two words for animals that we eat–their live-form word –e.g., cow, sheep, pig– and their edible-corpse form word –e.g., beef, mutton, pork. That evolved when we borrowed the Romance language word for what we ate but kept the Germanic language word for the animals.)

It started when I was a child–I was one of those who would cut the meat into tiny pieces and then spread it all over my plate so it looked like I’d eaten it. The idea of eating a cow, with those beautiful liquid brown eyes, was repulsive. (My father came from a family with thirteen kids in the hills of Tennessee, so I’d seen cows up close.) I even took a whole piece of veal once and hid it behind the dining room cabinet (taking it out to the wastebasket after it dried)! I refused to eat the squirrel and venison that my dad brought home from hunting trips (mostly, if not always, somebody else’s kill). I even refused to let my cocker spaniel share in that dead stock.

But now that I’m an adult, why do I maintain that diet? I get asked that a lot.

Funny, nobody says (with shocked exression)–”Gee, you eat meat? Why would anyone ever want to eat a toxins-laden dead corpse of an animal that lived a horrendous life and suffered an agonizing death? ” But they do often ask–usually treating it as a good-natured tease about a wacky alternative diet–why I’d want to avoid eating corpses.

James McWilliams got me thinking about this again this morning, when I read his “Bellying up to environmentalism” in the Washington Post for Nov. 16, 2009, where he noted that we should be asking questions in the reverse, that make meateaters feel uncomfortable at defending their own meateating. After all, there’s really no good reason for eating meat other than that someone is so addicted to its taste that he or she can’t exert the willpower to do without it.

The whys for not eating meat, on the other hand, are legion. Let me just list a few here, from the mundane to the truly significant:

1. cooking is easier–throw veggies in a pot and steam them; throw veggies in a pot and make soup, throw veggies in a fry pan and fry them, throw beggies in a pot and bake them; and variants thereon

2. clean-up is a lot easier–none of that icky clinging greasy layer of animal fat on every pan

3. refrigerated leftover use is easier–throw the leftovers in a pot and steam them (etc. from one above) and there’s none of that congealed lard on top of the leftovers in the fridge

4. rotten vegetables in the fridge are less disgusting than rotten corpses in the fridge

5. a decent diet is generally considerably cheaper

6. the more people who adopt a vegetarian diet, the more people who are currently going hungry could be fed

  • one of the many articles I’ve read said something that stuck with me (sorry, don’t have the cite)–that it takes the same resources to feed one meat-eater that it takes to feed about 80 vegetarians.
  • That’s because of the huge waste as you use up primary foodstuffs to feed the animals that will be slaughtered, then use up primary energy stuffs to slaughter, process, ship and deliver the meat to the meat eater, compared to even transported vegetables (localvore, with vegetables, is even more saving of resources)

7. without meat-eating, there are no feedlots where animals literally eat and sleep out the remainder of their short lives in their own shit

8. you can have a small flock of hens who live out their natural lives with nice living conditions (indoor/outdoor)

  • disclosure: I had one hen who lived to be 22; she was still laying eggs up until the week or so before her death from natural causes

9. Hens lay bigger and bigger eggs each year that they live past the first year w(hen most are slaughtered) and they still lay fairly regularly

  • disclosure: 6 eggs every 7 days was typical in my experience

10. Even hens have personalities

  • disclosure: when I lived in upstate New York, I had one named Gumption who loved to fly up to the top of a two-story house and survey her domain, and another named “kiss me” who would follow me around all day like a pet dog

11. Animals that we eat are as smart as–or smarter than–animals that we keep for pets (pigs compared to dogs, for example)

12. Animals care for their young and suffer when their young are taken from them (think dairy cattle and the young that are bred so that the mothers will give milk)

13. Some eating of animals is even more obnoxious than the norm (think “veal calves” that are taken and put in tiny sheds to they can fatten without any musculature development or “foie gras” where geese are fattened by having food stuffed down their throats with a tube)

14. Life is precious: there is no reason to sacrifice animal lives to lead a decent human life, so why do it?

15. Agribusiness–the main way that animals are raised and sold for meat–is an environmental nightmare

  • use of fertilizers to grow the grain that is fed to the cattle that are fed to the humans results in polluted land, water and air and uses up petroleum and other resources
  • consolidation results in long transportation (inhumane to animals; wasteful of oil and gas resources)
  • the subsidies (including some tax expenditures) for agriculture have gotten out of control–costly, misdirected, ill-conceived, and essentially now a form of corporate welfare for huge agribusiness enterprises

16. A meatless diet is healthier for humans than a meat-based diet, so we could cut health-care costs by simply cutting out meat

17. The process of butchering animals is a cruel leftover from the dark ages–people who work in slaughterhouses are inured to suffering, and that may well spill over into their “normal” lives outside work

18. The process of butchering animals is itself a source of harm–

  • sick animals are slaughtered, making it possible that eaters of that dead flesh will be sickened as well (mad cow disease);
  • animals are slaughtered in the midst of their own excrement, and some of that excrement gets into the food chain (making people sick as well);
  • the leftovers from the animal slaughter have to be gotten rid of somehow, leading to even more water, land and air pollution
  • workers are exposed to awful conditions–not just the process of mercilessly killing animals day in and day out, but also the risk of infection and injury on the line

19. The use of antibiotics in animal feed (given to healthy and unhealthy animals alike) ensures that resistant strains will develop even more rapidly, while leaving excess antibiotics not absorbed by the animals to pass out in their urine and excrement and into the land and water to act as toxins to others (including fish and birds and humans) leading to additional environmental nightmares…

20. Agribusiness pig farms and cattle feedlots are a blight on any humans within their vicinity (as well as a disaster for the natural world, noted above under environmental problems) from the stench of the manure (that can pollute the countryside for miles around) to the ugliness of the barren, treeless manure-laden fields.

So what to do? Maybe we should enact an excise tax on all meat products, like a”sin” tax for sodas and sweets and cigarettes. Comments, anyone?

PS Arthur C. Clarke has a great sci fi short story, taking place some time in the future, when a more advanced civilization than ours is aghast at the purported discovery that their ancestors used to–cover the young ones’ ears–eat dead corpses of animals…..Clarke’s ideas were way ahead of his time in lots of ways.

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