Relevant and even prescient commentary on news, politics and the economy.

Saint Janet Yellen: The Best Fed Chair Ever?

by Barkley Rosser  (originally published at Econospeak)

Saint Janet Yellen: The Best Fed Chair Ever?

OK, so the immediate reaction of many to this title might be to laugh, but I challenge anybody reading this to name another Fed Chair who was clearly better than she is.  I do not think you can.  However, one reason why one may not think much about her is that things have been so inconsequential since she has been Chair.  Nothing much has happened.  She continued the Quantitative Easing for awhile started by Bernanke and then stopped it.  Inflation has remained below 2% mostly.  Growth has not been dramatic, but it has been steady and higher than in most other advanced market capitalist economies.  There has not been a recession since 2009.  There have been no bubbles and no crashes.  Nothing dramatic has happened and certainly nothing bad, even if lots of deep problems of the US economy such as inequality remain.  But that one is not the Fed’s responsibility anyway.  So, bottom line, she has been doing a great job even if everybody is quite certain Trump will replace her, with all kinds of candidate names being thrown around.  But none of these will be better than she has been.

So, going backwards her most serious rival might be her immediate predecessor, who  looks to have played a substantial role in the save of September, 2008 that involved buying a lot of eurojunk from the ECB, only to roll it off over the next six months or so.  Of course some of the more innovative things done then were coming out of the NY Fed, but Bernanke did an excellent job when the crisis hit.  At the same time, Janet was around during that period, initially as San Fran Fed president, and then later as Vice Chair.  But where Bernanke looks not so good is the runup to that crisis, where he seems really not to have seen it coming.  Who saw it coming and as far back as 2005 sounding the alarm about the housing bubble?  Oh, right. Janet Yellen.

Comments (2) | |

The shallow industrial recession is fading in the rear view mirror

by New Deal democrat

The shallow industrial recession is fading in the rear view mirror

A year ago the “shallow industrial recession” induced by the strong US$ and imploding oil patch was bottoming.  At that time I described the historical pattern:

Typically new orders turn positive first (red, left scale in the graph below), followed by sales (green, right scale), and finally inventories (blue, right scale):


At that time I concluded:

Comments (0) | |

Industrial production: We’re DOOO …. oh, wait, it’s the global warming hoax

by New Deal democrat

Industrial production: We’re DOOO …. oh, wait, it’s the global warming hoax

At first blush yesterday’s negative industrial production print gives the lie to the proposition that the economy has left last year’s “shallow industrial recession” behind, as it looks to be going mainly sideways:

But a closer examination shows that is not the case.  Industrial production is broken up into three groupings: manufacturing (by far the biggest), utilities, and mining (including oil and gas).

So here is the information for manufacturing (blue. left scale) and mining (red, right scale):


Although the trend is modest, manufacturing has broken out to new highs.  And the energy patch is clearly seeing a rebound.

Which means that the *entire* reason for the decline is utilities:

Comments (10) | |

Recall and the General Strike

by Sandwichman

Recall and the General Strike

The tradition of the oppressed teaches us that the “emergency situation” in which we live is the rule. — Walter Benjamin, On the Concept of History, 1940

Back in December, I posted Full Employment and the Myth of the General Strike to start the conversational ball rolling about the idea of a general strike. It was the middle post in a three-part series on full employment.
Events move fast in 2017.
In the past two days, op-eds have appeared in the Washington Post and the Guardian taking up the issue of job action — and the general strike — as forms of resistance. On Monday, the Guardian published a Comment is Free by Francine Prose, “Forget protest. Trump’s actions warrant a general national strike.” This morning, “Where’s the best place to resist Trump? At work.” by labor lawyers, Moshe Marvit and Leo Gertner, was published as a PostEverything by the Washington Post.
Apparently, a call has gone out for a general strike on February 17, which strikes me (no pun intended) as rather precipitous. But the conversation is rolling.
Another element I would like to throw in is “what are the demands?” That Trump stop doing nasty things? That the GOP house and the GOP senate impeach the one who is going to sign their tax cut bills? I propose recall — total recall. Not only are the elected officials themselves corrupt, incompetent and unrepresentative but the electoral system that has installed them has been thoroughly corrupted and undemocratic. Throw the bums — AND THE NAG THEY RODE IN ON — out.
To give context and American (U.S.) historical resonance to that demand, it is useful to consider Populist and Progressive proposals for “direct democracy,” through initiative, referendum and the “imperative mandate” (recall) from over a century ago.
What am I really talking about here? What am I doing? The narrative time dimensions of the revolutionary general strike and of the reformist recall, as conceived by Populists and Progressives, could not be more contrasting. The general strike takes place in what Walter Benjamin referred to as jetztzeit — “not homogenous, empty time, but time filled by the presence of the now.”

Comments (3) | |

Why You Should Never Use a Supply and Demand Diagram for Labor Markets

by Peter Dorman    (published originally at Econospeak)

Why You Should Never Use a Supply and Demand Diagram for Labor Markets

You would know this if you read your Cahuc, Carcillo and Zylberberg, but you probably won’t, so read this instead.
A standard S&D diagram for the labor market might look like this:

It’s common to use W (wage) on the price axis and N (number of workers) on the quantity axis.  Equilibrium is supposed to occur at the W where quantity supplied equals quantity demanded.  From here you might introduce statutory minimum wage laws, or jobs with different nonpecuniary benefits and costs, etc.  The default conclusion is that free markets are best.

But hold on a moment.  S and D don’t tell you how many workers actually have jobs or how many jobs are actually filled—these are offer curves.  The S curve tells you how many workers would be willing to accept a job at various wages, and the D curve tells you how many jobs would be made available to them.  That’s not the same as employment.

They would be the same in a world in which labor markets operated according to a two-sided instantaneous matching algorithm, something designed by Google with no human interference at any stage of the process.  In such a world all offers would enter a digital hopper, and all deemed acceptable by someone else’s algorithm would be accepted immediately.  Maybe not Google but Priceline.

Comments (12) | |

Bad news: real non supervisory wages have actually declined over the last year

by New Deal democrat

Bad news: real nonsupervisory wages have actually DECLINED over the last year

This morning’s inflation news was even worse than I expected based on the increase in gas prices.

On a monthly basis prices rose +0.6%. Core prices rose +0.3%.

More importantly, YoY CPI was up +2.5%.  Core YoY CPI was up+2.3%:

This means real nonsupervisory wages are now actually *down* -0.1% YoY for the last year.


Here is the actual level of real nonsupervisory wages for the last 3 years:

Comments (3) | |

Trump And The Fed

by Barkley Rosser originally published at Econospeak, “Trump and the Fed”

It may be way too soon to say anything sensible about what Trump thinks about the Fed or will do  about it, but as the first person to have publicly called for appointing Janet Yellen as Chair (back in 2009), I figure I am more situated to stick my neck out to say something, especially when it looks like what is coming is a big contradictory mess.For the moment the Fed seems to be laying low, having made almost no change in policy or projections as reported by the diligent …Tim Duy.  They remain open to maybe tightening after March if the employment report improves notably, but otherwise seem to be on a “steady as you goes” path for the moment, doing almost nothing.  This on top of a letter from Congressman McHenry demanding they stop cooperating with any international banking entities until Trump  makes appropriate appointments.  And Tim adds a comment on a recent column by former Fed gov Kevin Warsh, who indulged in criticizing the Fed by demanding that it follow policies it is already following.  In this latest post Duy suggests that perhaps Warsh is running for Fed Chair, which means one has to appear to criticize Fed policy, even if one is not really.  Which raises the question of what Trump will do.

Let us start with something that hardly anybody has noticed, but is just taken for granted: that Trump almost certainly will not reappoint Janet Yellen as Chair.  This just seems to follow from his general attitude that all incumbents are no good, and especially anybody appointed by Obama, except for FBI Director Comey.  Why she is no good is not immediately obvious, and in fact several times over the last two years he praised  her “low interest rate policies” noting that as an old real estate developer he has always been a fan of such policies.  However, in June of this past year when the Fed did not raise the fed funds target rate, he denounced her personally and the Fed more generally for not doing so, charging that their failure to do so was part of a plot to goose the economy in an effort to help elect Hillary Clinton. Given that rhetoric it seems unlikely that he would reappoint her, although it could still come to pass that if when her term comes up next year markets seem to like her as well as GOP commentators, he could change his mind.

Comments (3) | |

A thought for Sunday: No, Trump isn’t imploding — but the opposition is broad and intense

by New Deal democrat

A thought for Sunday: No, Trump isn’t imploding — but the opposition is broad and intense

My post from two weeks ago, “No, Trump isn’t Imploding” got picked up by a few other sites within the past few days, and I wanted to follow up because we have a fuller picture of public opinion now.

Basically, Trump still isn’t imploding. He is holding his base. In fact, there is a little economic evidence that they are putting their wallets where their mouths have been. BUT, on the other hand, the opposition to Trump is revealing itself as broad-based and intense, in a way that hasn’t been seen in America since at least the 1960s (if not the 1930s or 1860s).

Here’s Gallup’s Presidential approval polling through yesterday:

Three weeks after the start of his Presidency, Trump’s last approval rating was 41%, down from 45% on his Inauguration Day. He has been between 41% and 43% for the last two weeks.

That’s simply not an implosion.  And his GOP base stands behind his controversial Executive Decrees.  For example, here’s the breakdown on support for his Muslim exclusion decree:


While Democrats are almost universally opposed, the support by GOPers is similarly almost universal.

Comments (3) | |