A oh, Some in Europe can’t take the pressure

Seems the austerity thingy is starting to hurt where it really counts. Just read via the AP:
… and amid growing concern in Europe that austerity aimed at cutting ballooning deficits may also be choking growth.
A dozen European Union leaders, including British Prime Minister David Cameron and Italian Premier Mario Monti, called Monday for an open-markets strategy to stimulate growth and jolt the region out of its economic doldrums.
“We meet in Brussels at a perilous moment for economies across Europe,” the leaders said. “Growth has stalled. Unemployment is rising. Citizens and businesses are facing their toughest conditions for years. ”
Of course their solution is “Free the Kraken!*“: 
The letter urges European nations to deregulate their service, research and energy sectors, forge trade ties with growing markets including China, Russia and South America — and even contemplate a free trade agreement with the United States.
How scared are they? They are this frightened: 
“Implicit guarantees to always rescue banks, which distort the single market, should be reduced,” the letter said. “Banks, not taxpayers, should be responsible for bearing the costs of the risks they take.”
Be still my beating heart, be still.

Of course, all of this is related to Greece. I found that the British paper, the Daily Telegraph is liveposting daily on the Debt Crisis:
“Live coverage of the international debt crisis and rollercoaster financial markets in the eurozone and US.” From today’s postings:
20.06 Jeremy Warner [financial editor] writes that the US has proved that the brutality of hire and fire really does work:
It is a simple fact of life that business is more prone to hire if it is allowed to fire. The major risk to business investment, which is that of an ongoing workforce liability, is thereby removed.
Vince Cable’s proposed shake-up of employment law is in truth of much more importance to the future of the UK economy than faffing around either with credit easing or squandering £12bn on a temporary tax cut. It’s vitally important that the task is not ducked.
And yet, considering the 12′s concern about austerity to cut debt and banks taking the hit, there was this today: 
22.02 Here we go. Eurozone ministers agree on ways to cut Greek debt to 123/124pc of GDP by 2020, aiming to go close to 120pc. Eurozone in talks with representatives of private sector about finding further debt relief. Issue of ECB forgoing profits on its holdings of Greek bonds remains a sticking point.
Coming soon to a theater near you!  The Son of Austerity.
*Kraken: In modern German, Krake (plural and declined singular: Kraken) means octopus but can also refer to the legendary Kraken.

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